Autumn Stirs Interior Reflection

by Guest on October 19, 2010

This is a guest post by Denise Gorss.

Autumn brings with it changes in weather, sending many of us indoors more regularly. We experience bright, sunny days that are quickly followed by torrential rains, cooler temperatures, and even the first flakes of snow. As we move to the interiors of homes and workplaces for refuge from these weather events, it’s a good time to consider the interior of our hearts.

God is present with us at all times, of course, but autumn invites a new look inside to see where God stirs. As the leaves fall from the trees, I am prompted to watch their slow descent to the ground, knowing that at other times, a burst of strong wind can blow off half the leaves from a tree in an instant. How well do I watch the movements of my interior being, reflecting on what the slow breezes or strong gusts of wind signal?

Ignatian spirituality counsels that we pay close attention to the movement of spirits within us. Can we find the quiet time this season to make a new effort to attend to the movements within and discern where God calls us to go?

{ 12 comments… read them below or add one }

Bob October 19, 2010 at 3:45 am

A very beautiful, reflective thought. I often wonder how atheists cope with the magesty and beauty of the changing seasons and offer as an explanation that it all happens by chance. This is a very good time for us to be aware of how the winds of the Spirit are shaping and blowing us toward new directions.

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Lynda October 19, 2010 at 4:28 am

Thank you for reminding me to “be still and know that I am God”. Too often I am enveloped in a flurry of activity when God is asking me to do less and be more present to God’s Spirit.

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Fran Rossi Szpylczyn October 19, 2010 at 6:09 am

What a beautiful and timely reminder to be still, to stop, to just be… to take our cues from nature and to find God in all things. This is not only lovely in thought, it is a beautiful piece of writing; well done and most generous.

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Marg October 19, 2010 at 7:20 am

This is my favorite season. Love October and November. They should be months of reflection, deciding which things to sweep out of our lives, which things to keep. With quiet time at a premium, I try to grab some every early morning for just five minutes. I will always crave more.

Thank you Denise, for the lovely images. God is asking all of us to be present and listen.

m.

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Meredith Gould October 19, 2010 at 7:32 am

You’ve articulated what I never realized I love about autumn. So many people tend to see death in this season, I see transformation and the possibility of new life. Thank you, Denise.

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Helen October 19, 2010 at 8:52 am

What a beautiful reflection! Those falling leaves often give me a sense of surrender. Another year has gone by for the growing season… the harsh winter will be here soon… what have I done for others in this past year?… where should I focus my limited energy now?

Denise’s reminder of attending to the movement of spirits within is most on target for me today. Probably everyday. Thanks

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Eric October 19, 2010 at 11:30 am

I agree with Helen. Being still is an act of surrender.

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Regina October 19, 2010 at 1:29 pm

Beautiful post, Denise, with beautiful thoughts stirred here.

I loved the link to “movement of spirits.” Thanks for including it!

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Angela October 19, 2010 at 3:10 pm

Thank you for this reminder Denise.
How difficult it is for me to quiet my soul and just be. Everywhere I am I bring myself with me.

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Denise October 19, 2010 at 6:15 pm

Thank you for all of the great comments, fellow PFO readers! Experiencing autumn, my favorite season, is one reason I love living in a place that gets all four seasons.

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Marg October 20, 2010 at 8:55 am

Denise, just wanted you to know that this was so personal to me. I am currently searching for my connection to the Spirit, so the movement of spirits link was great for me. Thanks again!

m.

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Frank October 28, 2010 at 7:36 am

I believe that God is in the bad things too, just harder to see. Our beloved Cardinal Joseph Bernardin (among others) taught us that.

Frank

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