Eusebio Kino

by Paul on March 15, 2011

Today is the 300th Anniversary of the death of a remarkable Italian, Eusebio Kino, S.J.

Kino arrived in the New World in 1681 and spent his first two years in Mexico City.  Then, for a quarter of a century, he traveled all around Mexico’s Northwest [including to what is today's Arizona]. He spread the faith and established 24 Missions and dependent chapels.

He was known to respect the indigenous peoples and learned the languages of Guaycara, Nabe and Cochimi. He wrote a memoir, Favores celestiales, about his missionary work the year before he died but it was not published until the 20th Century.

Although a statue of Father Kino is in the Capitol in Washington D.C. in recognition of his important role in forming links between two very different cultures, his burial site remained a mystery until 1966 when his remains were discovered by a joint Mexican & American team near Magadalena in northern Mexico.

{ 14 comments… read them below or add one }

Lynda March 15, 2011 at 4:19 am

A faithful servant walking God’s talk.

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:50 pm

Lynda,

Amen. Let’s hope we can say the same about ourselves.

Paul

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Fran Rossi Szpylczyn March 15, 2011 at 4:45 am

What an interesting person! I had never heard of him until now… thank you!

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:51 pm

Fran,

He is, as they say, “bigger” out West!

Paul

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Michelle March 15, 2011 at 7:23 am

History I didn’t know – thanks!

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:52 pm

Michelle,

To be honest, neither did I until Denise told me about him!

Paul

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Michelle March 17, 2011 at 8:56 pm

Thanks to Denise, too!

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Marg March 15, 2011 at 7:24 am

Love to learn something new!

m.

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:53 pm

Marg,

Me too.

Paul

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carol March 15, 2011 at 1:15 pm

Thank you!
This led me to Google Fr. Kino sj.
I have never heard of this Father before.

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:53 pm

Carol,

Ah. Where would be without Google?

Paul

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Angela Castillo March 15, 2011 at 6:21 pm

300 years ago, he had respect for indigenous people and learned their language. This says so much about him.

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Paul March 17, 2011 at 12:55 pm

Angela,

While Jesuits have many faults (I know!), we do tend to take other cultures and traditions seriously and treat them with respect. Not always, unfortunately, but as a general rule.

Paul

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Dr. John David Arnold March 21, 2011 at 8:26 pm

I was in Magdalena ,Sonora the day of the discovery of Padre Kino’s remains. A student on my way to the beachstopped at a pharmacy. When i came out i sawa commotion in the street. They were taking the stones from the street and padre Kino’ remains appeared. inspired i formed PPEP inc the next year using his itinerant model aboard an old Chevy school bus named La Tortuga. For more details http://www.ppep.org

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