Matt Weber – Harvard Faith

by Paul on February 5, 2013

Matt Weber takes us to visit Harvard for today’s segment of the living tour of Fearing the Stigmata.

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

Ron Montpetit February 5, 2013 at 5:41 am

I have nothing to say about the post above. It is this I want to comment on:

Words of Wisdom
“I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. Your Christians are so unlike your Christ.” — Mohandas K. Ghandi

Considering Ghandi’s “culture, the comment above makes him look stupid to me. Consequently, I have lost a lot of respect for someone I used to admire. The Indian “Cast System!!!???” Did you like that element of your nature?

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Emma February 5, 2013 at 4:32 pm

I suppose that I would say to Ghandi, “I agree. Only Christ went willingly to His death, conquered it and lived to tell about it. The rest of us are fumbling fools who fall far short of Him. The most wonderful gift that our faith provides for is the gift of love and forgiveness, the seventy x ‘s seven times we are to forgive and be forgiven. We are all on our own spiritual path. Some further along than others. Those further evolved are called to reach our hands out, love and help those who have stumbled to get back on the path. Oh, and we should be careful to remember that someone can have material wealth, but be spiritually poor. ” Hope that helps. Good to hear from you! :)

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Denise J February 5, 2013 at 5:14 pm

I think there is pretty good evidence — including several hunger strikes to support the rights of untouchables — to show that Gandhi became aware of the sinful aspects of the caste system in his later years. He worked hard to change them, as much as any one man could.

I also think that Indians under British imperial rule in the 19th and 20th century saw some of the worst sides of Europeant/Western/”Christian” culture, and precious little Christ-like behavior from us.

Lastly, I am willing to give Gandhi the benefit of the doubt, and take his comment not as a condemnation of Christians and Christianity, but as a challenge to us to live up to our professed ideals. Especially when I am in a place where there are few or no other Christians, I need to be reminded constantly how crucial it is to act with justice, mercy, compassion, wisdom, and as much understanding and knowledge as I can muster.

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Tim February 5, 2013 at 10:24 am

“…Once you are open about faith, once you are open about religion, you will be surprised about all the other people that come to talk to you about it themselves, from different perspectives…”

Incredibly wise words from this young man. The same holds true in all aspects of our day to day life: at work, at play, with our family, our friends, our co-workers, even with the enlightened ones in D.C.

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Andie February 5, 2013 at 11:01 am

How absolutely refreshing this is! To have someone young and ‘real’ talk about the faith. This is so needed and necessary….let’s have more of it!

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Denise February 6, 2013 at 3:02 pm

We have one more video to share with you next week, Andie.

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Fran Rossi Szpylczyn February 5, 2013 at 11:10 am

I really love this book- and Matt’s approach, while whimsical, is also so engaging, and very serious.

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Jim February 5, 2013 at 4:52 pm

Francis of Assisi famously said, “Preach the Gospel at all times and when necessary use words.” It’s easy for an introvert like me to use that as an excuse never to talk about faith, but Matt’s observations point out the problem with that. If one authentic person talks about faith, that brings a lot of other voices into the conversation, and those voices aren’t heard much in the current atmosphere..

Christianity has an image problem because so much of our faith conversation (and thus, our PR) comes from those who use Jesus for personal branding.

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